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20130209
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facing the city. welcome. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background, where you grew up, went to school, and what kind of jobs to have had. >> i grew up in the philadelphia area, in new jersey. i went to school up and down the east coast. i went to undergrad at duke university. i went to law school at harvard. after clerking for a judge, i came out here in 1997. i have been here for the last 14 years. i have always lived in the castro. i am an attorney. i started out in private practice. i settle private law firm during complex commercial litigation. in 2002, and moved over to the sentences the city attorney's office where i worked on the trial team doing trials for the city, handling my own cases, and supervising a team of attorneys as well. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? >> i always assumed i would go back to the philadelphia area since that is where my family is. i was always interested in san francisco in terms of what it is as a city, its culture, it's amazing lgbt community. i came out here for a summer, fell in love with it. i have been interes
do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be able to acknowledge others. i see police chief [speaker not understood] is with us. and as we get other names, we will announce those. so, let's give them all a round of applause, please. (applause) >> as i indicated, you have the program before you. we did one additional note on the program, is that the city administrator naomi kelly will be introducing the mayor lee. and due to scheduling conflict, supervisor london breed will probably be arriving later and will make her welcoming remarks towards the end of the program. following the invocation by reverend harlan jones, nor a griffin will make a presentation, a dram
a leather flight jacket to thank mr. lahood for the great gift to our great city. the new money that is going to be used here is going to create 1,000 new jobs before the end of the year with many more jobs to come after that. that is something to applaud. thank you again secretary lahood for that. this is one point 7 miles very similar to the length of the golden gate bridge when 75 years ago that was going to be built and little did we know what that bridge would bring to the economy of san francisco and marin and as we look ahead for 75 years it's interesting what this does for this region. you know the bay area has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that
building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million pe
. (applause) @@to the fifth ann awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughout the city to make san francisco one of the greatest places to live. the mayor's office of neighborhood services also known as mons focuses on neighborhood outreach and engagement. it is an honor to be here with community leaders who are dedicated to the same principles and
the transportation director in the great city of san francisco and it's my great pleasure and delight to welcome you today to a great celebration. what we're celebrating here is the partnership that many of you that are with us today that have gotten to this point. we are celebrating the fact that we have gotten to this point and the investments that will central sup way will bring to san francisco and what it means for this city and this region. i can't tell you what an honor and privilege it is to serves as the transportation director in this great city. we ordered san francisco weather to deep the dust down and we are in a construction site and it's a great time for transportation across the nation largely because of some of the folks you will hear who are to my left and your right. it is also a great time to be in san francisco because we have leadership here in the city that are encouraging innovation, that recognize the importance of investment and infrastructure, and there is no better manifestation of that than this project and that prt is man manifested in a way that i can see no more s
of the city address. his administration's focus is on creating jobs, making sure that all of our residents have access to those jobs,st and from local hireness and job readiness, training and placement, we are moving towards equality for all with the mayor's leadership. ladies and gentlemen, i'd like to introduce the 43rd mayor of san francisco, mayor edwin lee. (applause) >> good afternoon, everyone. all right. welcome to city hall and happy black history month here in san francisco. nobody got it better than san francisco. (applause) >> thank you, naomi. i want to thank you for that introduction and just a recall of what i said earlier this week. but i also said something else, too, that i want you to continuously know the way i have attempted to manage this great city of ours for everybody. that is, i'm not shy about asking for help. and when it comes to the challenges we have in the african-american community, we need help. and i have been deliberately assembling a very important group of people who are going to help me get the job done. and you've seen some of these people already. th
rocking san francisco city hall indian way. how about a big round of applause for all our dancers? all right. [applause] all right. once again let's hear it for your singers, our dancers from everywhere here in the san francisco bay area. [applause] all right. good singing. good dancing. posting the eagle staff at this time. be shout out to larry harrison for taking care of our eagle staff. you maybe seated. calling up to the podium at this time michael lupdtin and vice president of the marketing and branding for this station. >> hi everyone. can you hear me? hello everyone. i am from kqmd and i wanted to welcome you to this eighth annual indian heritage celebration. we are honored to be honoring four heroes from the community who have tirelessly worked throughout the year to provide the kind of service that admissible media is about and engaged community and robust heritage is about. nominated by community leaders they have worked at the grass-roots level and share the highest values we all share. as a public supported media organization we are committed to this and in no
-ers. you know what's interesting? i've been around city hall long enough to watch the nen awards grow and mature into what it is today. so, i also want to give a special shout out to daniel homesy who is the originator of this. thank you, daniel. (applause) >> also i want to acknowledge his right hand christina palone, the new director, mon, mayor's office neighborhood services over there in that corner. (applause) >> and for those of you that don't know, i represent district 10, that's the southeast neighborhoods. that's bayview, that's potrero hill, visitacion valley, it's a little hollywood, it's dogpatch. it used to be the portola, half of it. my heart is still with you, but i'm glad like the speaker said, it is whole. and that is what's important, is that that neighborhood remains whole so that our city will be whole. you agree? [cheering and applauding] cheers >> so, a few years back there was this little idea to take back the bayview and really began to rewrite the history and the narrative that we often hear about in bayview. and it actually started, ironically, with a small l
, the fact that a young person is so committed and so dedicated to their neighborhood and to the city is something that we should all be very proud of and let's make sure that we have more jack ollengers. to that i will turn it over to ruth wallace. and by the way, i don't know what would be of the portola without ruth wallace. so, ruth, thank you so much for everything you do. (applause) >> thank you, david. well, i have the easiest job because jack's biois the shortest. he's 12. he's done a great job. * because of him, he's actually helped us to finance the portola garden district scholarships at city college of san francisco. and will continue. thank you. (applause) >> jack? ah, come on. >> i don't think jack wants to say anything, but i think that jack just basically said that actions speak louder than words. so, thank you. (applause)♪ >> jack, are your parents or your family here? yep? so, if we could ask jack's family to please stand up and be recognized. because this is a family effort. [cheering and applauding] >> thank you very much. thank you. ♪ >> you can see the user b
times. his focus on steadfast on balancing the budget, reforming city pensions and working hard on economic development and job retention. he is making city government more responsive and efficient and making public safety a top priority. mayor lee is a long time public servant. prior to becoming mayor, he served as city administrator where he focused on government efficiency and measures and reforms that reduced the size and cost of government. mayor lee first began working for the city and county of san francisco in 1989 as the investigator for the city's first whistle blower program. prior to employment with the city and county of san francisco, he was the managing attorney for the asian law caucus. i first met ed in 1992 when he became the executive director for the human rights commission and we were both 16. that's two decades ago, ed. i watched him soon become the director of city purchasing and then going on to become the director of public works. i think ed is the only mayor in city history that can carry tlau on the campaign promise to fill the potholes because
>> good afternoon, everyone. all right. welcome to city hall and happy black history month here in san francisco. nobody got it better than san francisco. (applause) >> thank you, naomi. i want to thank you for that introduction and just a recall of what i said earlier this week. but i also said something else, too, that i want you to continuously know the way i have attempted to manage this great city of ours for everybody. that is, i'm not shy about asking for help. and when it comes to the challenges we have in the african-american community, we need help. and i have been deliberately assembling a very important group of people who are going to help me get the job done. and you've seen some of these people already. they are malia cohen, london breed at the board. they have to face all the different politics. but i know they're going to be great partners with me because we've got the right objectives to happen. we want everybody included in the city. we have naomi kelly, harlan kelly, mohammed nuru, rhonda simmons heading upstreamly important departments. and i've got to say t
-contained city rather than just one man's humble abode. >> william randolph hearst sat here in the center of the table. he liked to be surrounded by his guests. he sat here so he could talk and understand more about his guests. these were newswcrthy people that sat here around him for his meals. >> but it was the land just below his home that hearst truly cherished, a place referred to simply as "the ranch." for a man who lived his life in the public eye, this was his true oasis, a place to slip into obscurity. >> so he built his castle here at san simeon, but the love of the ranch, the cowboy lifestyle--it was always something that hearst really favored. but william randolph hearst wrote a letter to his mother--once quoting, then, from mr. hearst-- that if he could spend a month anywhere in the world, it would be at the ranch at san simeon. >> today, william randolph's cowboy dreams are being lived out by his gisat-grandson steve hearst. the now 80,000-acre hearst ranch is one of the largest and oldest working cattle ranches on the california coast. but when the new generation of hearsts
? this is a great, great honor to be here in city hall of san francisco. the person that nominated me for this award is laverne roberts. maybe some of you knew her as laverne morrisy. she went home to her reservation. she is piute and went to her home. where is her home? >> [inaudible] >> in earring ton nevada. we went there once and she has a beautiful house and live there is and now she is even running for the council of her tribe. laverne was going to surprise me and be here this evening, but she had an outbreak of one of her illnesses. her foot started to bleed and now she has to be on crutches for a while, so she had to turn in her plane ticket and her taxi fare, but otherwise she would have been here tonight and many of us know laverne and we would like to say a prayer that she gets better soon and can come and see us. this is for laverne. yes. please let's clap our hands for laverne. [applause] >> thank you. laverne roberts was honored here in this space two years ago. thank you laverne. and i think i can say a lot more about being indian and how much i am proud to b
. an san francisco being such an international city, many of our roots are from immigrant families. we understand the problem. we did do something about it and continue that effort. i want to thank the us attorney's office for being here. and so many of you who have from the community done and continue to do what you can do to end human trafficking. this is such an important challenge for all of us. and because we here at from immigrant families; we hear from immigrant women and girls. the stories are real. they come across international borders. and so san francisco being the city that is not only aware of this, and aware of international traffic that occurs we have to continue doing something about it. if anything, our goal is of course to educate our youth; to make sure they understand that they have partners in both city government and in the community to help. those that are lucky and can survive; all of this and when they end up on the shores of san francisco, if we can find them and provide them with support and help them change their lives. and then get to the busine
. you heard tom mention restoretive justice, right here, again, right here in this city across the bridge, and i know as superintendent talked about, you are doing amazing stuff in san francisco. tony smith in oakland has an initiative that is dealing with not just things like restoretive justice alone but positive behavioral interventions and supports. couple that with response to intervention, whole school reform strategies that work on transforming the way the school is functioning and in so doing making it a more positive culture for everybody. it brings in parental engagement in families and it has the very tough conversations, in the case of oakland i know for sure, around things like race with an african american male focus in that community because it's appropriate for that community, and the way all these things link together. so certainly bullying and harassment is an avenue into transforming the way schools work. just like discipline is an avenue into transforming the way schools work, as is standards and good assessments, it is how all these things fit together t
] and next to him is george gaston and elect to the district attorney of the city and county of san francisco in 2011 after winning more than 62% of the vote which in san francisco is very enviable and focused on reducing violent crime, protecting vulnerable victims and respecting with high school truancy and rel haven't to the conversation today. last is cheryl young and the chief executive director of gate path and oversees a large nonprofit in san mateo county and focus on turning disabilities into possibilities and she's a wonderful addition to the panel and it's an area that school districts have to deal with in terms of special needs and what we're talking about affects these children if not more than the other children so thank you cheryl. [applause] so we have a large panel and they can all tell you i sent them an email yesterday said you will have a brief time to say what you do, what your organization is doing, address the needs of the kids suffering or facing bullying and i told them they have two to three minutes, not 23 minutes and i'm going to hold them to it so jeff let's star
of october every 6th through 12th grader in san francisco city public schools will have had the opportunity to see bully and not only view that documentary but also go through a rich can urriculum from our teachers understanding the lessons from that movie. we all know a movie in and of itself doesn't make a difference, but i will tell you, we didn't start our approach to understanding it with the movie bully. we're very proud 234 san francisco that we have had an approach based on restoretive practices where we're not about suspending students and getting them out of school, we want them to understand what the impacts are and the impact it has. we've been a part of restoretive practices now for over 4 years in san francisco but when we heard about the movie bully, and bullying is a phenomenon we can all relate to. as i shared with the students yesterday at hertz theater, when i see the film i can relate to instances when i was bullied as a kid. when i reflect upon being a student in the public schools, i can think about situations where i was a bully, where i said things, where i did th
in 2004. we all remember those moving pictures of smiling couples on the steps of city hall, some of them their children watching on. his actions in 2004 thrust this civil rights issue into the national spotlight and cemented his reputation as a fearless public officials who does what he thinks is right. under mayor newsom's energetic leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of. please welcome our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom. >> my role was to get tom to speak. i'm just going to jump in because i want to keep you all on time. you've got an agenda packet and i'm going to be held accountable if you don't meet it. roslyn, let's pick up on tom's passion. he told me a couple points that are important, that is the consciousness awareness, this growing consciousness around bullying. and it's a question i guess that requires, has bullying gotten w
that in the ideal, product that is are safer are what's purchased for all city institutions and city agencies and offices, so this approved list has the list of like light bulbs and commuters and cleaning products and stuff like that, toilet paper, you know, that are either less toxic or less straining of resources and so that approved list can be one of the tools that you can use in fire houses, in this office, probably a lot of that's already happening, and across all of san francisco offices and agencies. so, any ideas before we open for questions about little things in the fire houses that you would want to see happen or commitments that you can make in those spaces? yes? >> [inaudible]. i probably don't need a microphone, but -- >> they need it. >> maybe i need to turn it on. it's on. can you hear me? okay. janet, as articulated by a couple of people already, one of our issues is diesel exhausts in the fire houses and cal ocean does require that we have exhaust extractors and over the years that i have been in the fire department, those extractors have used sometimes and haven't worked o
of the past. i also wanted to say we need to work and i see representatives here of cities and counties because those same children are on sports teams under the city rec department, they are receiving services and they are in programs with the county and so having this training, having this awareness go beyond the schools is really important. so i thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, bu
. our dream would be to have a similar program to ours in every city in the united states. obviously that takes time, our speakers are volunteers, they aren't paid. it may take 4 or 5 hours to go into schools so resources are always an issue. many schools are afraid to invite speakers in to talk about any religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we
,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i believe kroshed the threshold of 140,000 students nationwide and we are working to get to the million and the idea is a million is a tipping point . a million kids in america. that's like one in ten basically in public schools. that gets embedded so over time every september schools are starting with that method to have that agreement, and along the way we're also trying to deliver youth action and educate ideas and teach the schools and districts about social emotional learning because after they see the film they want to know what do we do next? how do we impact that? and that's what i am up to and it's great to be here. >> thanks so much for coming here. we appreciate it. [applause] >> good a
of the differences in different cultures which could be in two different schools in the same city about who the victims of bullying might be and the hot shots in each of the schools, so for example research showed that the social attitudes within a particular setting and the community and the parents can manifest themselves in terms of who folks are picking out to target; right? so for example at maybe a high end school like lowell ore gunn you might have bullying because you're not taking enough ap class. i have heard this and there is so mush pressure and criticized by the peers if they're not smart enough. in other schools it's the opposite and bullied because they are smart when that is not the krult. maybe in texas where it's a different culture that we saw in the movie that perhaps football is everything and if a child isn't good at sports they're an outcast. i would like to ask how or if addressing the cultural needs at each school how can we -- is this all one way of doing this, or do you feel there are different needs in different communities? and i think perhaps the law enfo
the rubber meeting the road a little bit and it's the hardest stuff. we screened in sioux city before anyone had seen the movie for all the administrators in the movie. obviously we've been down a long road with this community and i will make a point thanking them for their courage in making this film, which is what you thought nobody would ever do, which is allow a camera to film for a year inside a building and film those interactions and those conversations. but they did it because they wanted to do better. but when we first did the screening, someone that had been an administrator for many many years basically said, listen, if we're going to be honest in unpacking this movie, then we have to recognize and i'll be the first one to say it, that i have made those mistakes. i have rushed to judge. i have gotten it wrong in exactly that same way many times in my career. then suddenly the conversation started to flow and not only did people connect to how they missed those moments and that they don't, that they felt they didn't have the training to catch those moments or really do that inne
>> the renovation of balboa park, the oldest in the city of san francisco, and now it is the newest part in the city of san francisco. through our partnership, and because of public investment from the two thousand eight fund, we are celebrating a renewal and an awakening of this park. we have it safer, happier, more joyous. >> 3, 2, 1, [laughter] =--[applause] >> it is a great resource for families, to have fun in the city, recreation. >> this is an amazing park. we have not revitalized it without public and private investment. the critical piece of the process of this renovation was that it was all about the community. we reached out to everyone in this community. we love this park dearly and they all had thoughts and ideas and they wanted to bring their own creativity and their personality to bear on the design. what you see is what the community wanted. these ideas all came from the residents of this community. as a result, there is a sense of ownership, pride and responsibility that goes along with what is going to be an exciting park. >> when the new california academy of scie
, but you can actually see it on the outside. so, when people are walking around the city they can actually see the green and environmental aspects. >> what better way to show that the puc cares about the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >> hey, san franciscans, here with the weekly buzz. it's the first week in february, and we have things that won't break the bank
take this moment in time and thank in person for their contributions to the city. and i think we have this year's winner epitomizes the kind of person that we should take the time to acknowledge and to go further into that i'd like to actually take a moment and invite now our supervisor district 8 malia cohen who would like to share her opening thoughts on this award. (applause) >> can i just tell you how good it feels to be up here, to look out to see all the people that make everything possible, that really makes san francisco wonderful? and i just have got to give a special shout out. you knew i grew up in the portola for those that don't know. [cheering and applauding] >> right there at the intersection of silly man and colby, my parents still live there. that's where it started for me. but tonight is a night that we have abopportunity * to up lift and support and say thank you to all the people that certainly provide me support and provide me the motivation to get up and come to work every single day. this is an opportunity to thank and praise the people that call me stop, that
the present playground and center is today was purchased by the city for $27,000. in the 1950s, the center was expanded by then mayor robinson and the old gym was built. thanks to the passage of the 2008 clean and safe neighborhood parks bond, the sunset playground has undergone extensive renovation to its four acres of fields, courts, play grounds, community rooms, and historic gymnasium. >> here we are. 60 years and $14 million later, and we have got this beautiful, brand-new rec center completely accessible to the entire neighborhood. >> the new rec center houses multi-purpose rooms for all kinds of activities, including basketball, line dancing, playing ping-pong, and arts and crafts. >> use it for whatever you want to do, you can do it here. >> on friday, november 16th, the dedication and ribbon cutting took place at the sunset playground and recreation center celebrating its renovation. it was raining, but the rain clearly did not dampen the spirits of the dignitaries, community members, and children in attendance. [cheering and applauding]
volumes of san francisco as a world-class city with world-class art and culture. for more information, visit >> [applause] >> wow. thank you very much angela. let me say -- please, please sit down. all right. that's for my has ratty. >> no, that's mine. >> angela we really miss you here. you have been such a force and i enjoy working -- we will get that done. i assure you. that's a wonderful addition. not just north beach and another attraction for visitors from around the world as part of the international community and i honor that so thank you. thank you for working with me on ending homelessness as well and thank you even for being your civil rights attorney and you are still representing people in need and i appreciate that. i know angela represents again the kind of contributions the italian community has made to our great city and continues to make and i am here to tonight to wish you a great year of italian culture but to kick start it. it was really just a few months ago that the ambassador ofity italy came through and talk about this wonderful thing they were to do
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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